Today's Love Tip
Roughly two-thirds of marriages do not survive after an admission of infidelity. If you've undergone a divorce after your spouse cheated, then you probably are feeling anger, sadness, resentment and a lot of other negative emotions. You... Read More
More Love Advice
Process of Healing from Infidelity

A discovered extramarital affair of your partner is indeed devastating and knowing that you have been betrayed by the one you love will surely turn your world upside down.

Overcoming pain from marital infidelity is a long and tedious process but if both parties are willing to give the marriage another shot and believes that divorce is not the end of it all it is still possible for a happily ever after. Healing from infidelity requires both parties' cooperation. {relatedarticles}

If you are trying to make things work to keep the marriage together, you will have to accept the reality that this journey will not be an easy ride and will take more than the usual effort to put things together. Even the betrayed spouse should do conscious efforts to ignite the love and rebuild the trust again.

For the unfaithful partner, it will mean double effort to prove that you are sorry and commit that you will be honest a hundred percent this time around. It will be nice to lay all the facts of the affair so the other partner would also realize his/her shortcoming.


Next is to be sorry about it. Remorse is the key in mending anything broken. Admitting to the mistake is the only way your spouse could even consider taking you back. Change your lifestyle. Accept the new rules that will be stated by the betrayed spouse like no boy's night out or dinner dates with clients of the opposite sex again. Avoiding the scenes that led you to infidelity would be a good sign for your partner to start trusting you again.{relatedarticles}

On the other hand, the betrayed party also has steps to consider when healing from infidelity. First, you must clearly point out what must be done to regain your trust once again. Only you can decide what can mend your broken heart so it is best to make it clear. Choosing to forgive is probably the hardest step but it is necessary in order for both of you start over with clean slates. Lastly, spend time and avoid having to bring back the affair topic again. This way healing from infidelity might be faster for both of you.

Rebuilding a marriage is another leap for the both of you not only to restore your family but also for self-contentment and maturity

About The Author

Tammy Love understands the challenges of surviving infidelity and is now the chief editor of Surviving Infidelity.com . She is now helping those who have suffered Infidelity to survive and thrive and move forward by providing support and a community to help each other through the difficult times.

Contact Tammy to find out more about How to Survive Infidelity and get your free 6 Steps to Surviving Infidelity Report; learn more in

http://www.surviving-infidelity.com/infidelity-news.html


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Is An Open Relationship For You?

If you've been to a movie theater recently, you probably noticed that films about open, or "no strings," relationships are very hot right now. These flicks are usually typical romantic comedies in which two people who initially began an affair with no plans for commitment eventually - usually after many comically choreographed disasters and challenges - end up realizing that they are soul mates and live happily ever after.

While it's great that non-traditional relationships are getting attention in mainstream media, these depictions are not very close to reality. Your experience with an open relationship will depend on many factors, but it's smart to take these factors into consideration before making a decision about the kind of arrangement you ultimately choose. Before you hang an "OPEN" sign on your relationship, keep this in mind. {relatedarticles}

Dispelling Myths and Setting Boundaries

There are many common myths and misunderstandings when it comes to open relationships. It's best to get these cleared up before exploring this lifestyle further.

Myth 1: Open relationships are a recent trend. The reality is that people have been having mutually agreed-upon, non-monogamous relationships for thousands of years. The only difference is that contemporary attitudes about sex and relationships have made it easier for people to be honest about their arrangements.


Myth 2: People in open relationships have lots of sex with lots of people and take sexual risks. Not necessarily. For most couples, the reality of non-monogamy does not involve orgies every weekend. People in open relationships have jobs, families and other responsibilities like everyone else and aren't focused on finding sex partners all the time. The only difference is that if and when they do meet someone they are attracted to, they have the option of following the attraction without guilt. Interestingly, studies show that people in mutually agreed-upon, open relationships have lower rates of STDs than those who are simply cheating behind their spouses' backs.{relatedarticles}

Myth 3: There must be something wrong with your partner or the relationship if you want to open it up. Many couples who choose non-monogamy are satisfied with their partners and value their primary relationships. However, they may feel that humans feel sexually attracted to many people in a lifetime and sometimes may want to explore their desires.

Myth 4: Opening up a relationship dooms it to fail. Occasionally, couples who are unhappy but reluctant to end their relationship may sometimes try and "open up" the relationship in order to shop around for a new significant other from the comfort of their current arrangement. This is a symptom of an already troubled bond and a misuse of non-monogamy. Many couples have found that an open relationship works fine for them when practiced correctly. That's not to say it's easy; jealousy, insecurities and dishonestly can wreck an open relationship easily, which is why you should choose to embark on one only if you know the risks. It's very important to have a solid, healthy relationship between you and your partner before venturing into non-monogamy.


There are many types of non-monogamous relationships. Most dating relationships technically begin as open, when both people are still determining their compatibility. Some couples choose to keep their relationships casual longer than others. This can work as long as both people agree and one does not end up falling hard for the other and secretly wanting a commitment. This can (and often does) get tricky! In more established, committed couples, an open relationship is one in which there are two primary partners, and they have an agreement that allows each to have outside affairs, but share a commitment to remaining with their primary partner in a loving relationship.{relatedarticles}

There are other, alternative versions of open relationships that are more unconventional. For example, polyamory, in which the relationship involves 3 or more people in a loving, committed bond. This is much like the plural marriage found in some sects of Mormonism and other cultures around the world. In other kinds of arrangements, some couples choose to have their sexual adventures together, whether among friends or at swinging clubs. Scared yet? These alternative lifestyles are definitely not for everyone, and nobody should be pressured into sexual arrangements that go against their faith or morals. Ultimately, it's up to you. But whatever you choose, be sure to set ground rules.


Having ground rules is a must if you want your open relationship to be successful. Some couples may have rules limiting what sexual acts they choose to do with non-primary partners or have other ways of ensuring that the alternate lover does not usurp the primary's position. If you're the alternate sex partner in a non-monogamous relationship, understand that you have rights and that your position differs from that of being the "other woman" in a cheating situation. Don't be afraid to speak your mind and discuss your concerns if you feel you're not being respected.{relatedarticles}

Jealousy

One of the first objections raised by critics of open relationships is that it's impossible to share someone you love with another person. The jealousy would drive you crazy and eventually lead to the end of the partnership. It's not surprising that this is the first thing that comes to mind; jealousy is often seen as an expression of love and is celebrated and encouraged in popular media. The truth is that jealousy is not a sign of true love, nor is it a healthy, positive emotion. The 1960s counterculture preached sexual openness as the root of peace and social reform because it requires selflessness and logical thinking rather than possessiveness and raw, destructive emotion. In many ways they were correct.

While the flower children may have had a point, their ideals do not always translate easily to our modern relationships. Jealousy can be an extremely difficult emotion to overcome. It's rooted in fear of loss, insecurities and many other deep primal anxieties that are not easy to get rid of overnight. Ideally, people who are in successful open relationships usually are a) not very prone to jealousy and b) able to confront and deal with jealousy by talking extensively with their partners and setting boundaries so they feel more in control of the non-monogamous arrangement. Couples' therapy can be a valuable tool for helping overcome jealousy.


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How to Create a Romantic Valentine's Day Bedroom Using Your 5 Senses
If you are looking for a fun and exciting way to spice up your bedroom when the most romantic night of the year rolls around, why not start with your five senses? Creating a sensory, romantic ambiance with your five senses is sure to put an exclamation point at the end of your Valentine's Day.{relatedarticles}

Smell

Let's start with your sense of smell because this is usually the first thing we are aware of when we enter a room. It's really easy to create a romantic aroma in our bedroom because there is an endless array of aromatherapy candles and incense.

So pick your favorite scented candle(s) and light it up! We are, after all, still mammals, and our sense of smell triggers all sorts of chemical reactions in the brain that arouse our sensuality.


Sight
As we enjoy a romantic aroma in our bedroom, we (almost) simultaneously take in the sights of our surroundings. When you are creating a romantic setting, romantic lighting is an absolute must! My preference is to keep all electrical lights off and use only candles. But you might prefer the effervescent glow of a salt crystal lamp or the dimness of light provided by putting a pink shade or scarf over your lampshade. {relatedarticles}

Touch

Tactile stimulation, more commonly referred to as touch, is essential for putting us in a romantic mood. Therefore, I suggest cozy pillows, soft silky sheets, and maybe a fuzzy throw rug. But the crown in the jewel here is rose petals sprinkled on and around the bed!


Sound
Now who doesn't love a little music to create a romantic ambiance in your bedroom? It doesn't matter who your favorite recording artist is, have background music playing in your bedroom at a soft low volume. Remember, you don't want to have to yell over the music to have a conversation with your partner. If you are not a music lover, try having the sound of ocean waves breaking on the shore - or anything that relaxes you and gets you in the mood.{relatedarticles}

Taste

Have a bottle of wine and/or champagne chilling by the bedside along with some chocolates and/or chocolate covered strawberries - you get the idea. Chocolate is known to be an aphrodisiac so that is why I suggest it, but any type of your favorite food and/or drinks will do.

There are plenty more ways you can use your five senses to create a romantic bedroom ambiance. Whatever puts an exclamation point on the end of your Valentine's Day (night) is a go!

About The Author

During the past 25 years, renowned relationship expert Dr. Patty Ann Tublin has helped hundreds of people rekindle romance and reignite passion in their relationships. The solutions in her Relationship ToolboxTM help couples stop fighting, and re-build romance so intimacy inside and outside the bedroom can flourish. Through her successful 25-year marriage and her experience of raising 4 children, Dr. Patty Ann has earned an international reputation for saving relationships. To reignite your flames of passion, visit her site at www.drpattyann.com.

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